Abstracts in Urgent Care: September, 2015

SEAN M. McNEELEY, MD Adverse Events Unlikely in Patients with Negative Findings on Cardiac Evaluation Key point: Adverse events in patients admitted with negative findings on cardiac evaluation are very infrequent. Citation: Weinstock MB, Weingart S, Orth F, et al. Risk for clinically relevant adverse cardiac events in patients with chest pain at hospital admission. JAMA Intern Med 2015;175:1207–1212. In this 5-year retrospective study of patients seen in an emergency department for symptoms potentially representing …

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Abstracts in Urgent Care: January, 2015

Fatigue and inappropriate antibiotic prescription Key point: As the day goes on, resistance to prescribe potentially inappropriate antibiotics seems to fade. Citation: Linder JA, Doctor JN, Friedberg MW, et al. Time of day and the decision to prescribe antibiotics. JAMA Intern Med. 2014 Oct 6; doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.5225. [Epub ahead of print]   Previous research has shown that resistance to making the easier choice tends to fade as fatigue increases. Physicians make many difficult decisions during …

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Abstracts in Urgent Care: September, 2012

Age-based cutoffs for D-dimer levels Key point: Age-based cutoffs for D-dimer levels can more accurately rule out deep venous thrombosis than the conventional cutoff level. Citation: Schouten HJ, Koek HL, Oudega R, et al. BMJ. 2012; 344: e2985. Researchers measured D-dimer values in some 650 patients suspected of having deep venous thrombosis but who had a low clinical probability according to their Wells score. Compression ultrasonography was used to confirm the diagnosis. Various cutoff levels …

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Abstracts in Urgent Care: June, 2012

Is Oral Antibiotic Therapy Enough for Children with Acute Pyelonephritis? Key point: A randomized trial failed to prove the acceptability of oral antibiotic monotherapy relative to sequential intravenous and oral therapy, but evidence supporting and treatment alone as an option is accumulating. Citation: Bocquet N, Sergent AA, Jais JP, et al. Randomized trial of oral versus sequential IV/oral antibiotic for acute pyelonephritis in children. Pediatrics. 2012; 129(2): e269-275. Children with acute pyelonephritis typically receive intravenous …

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Abstracts in Urgent Care: May, 2012

ED Physicians Vary Widely in Use of Head CT Key point: ED physicians vary widely, by as much as 300% for patients who presented with atraumatic headache, in their ordering patterns for head CTs. Citation: Prevedello LM, Raja AS, Zane RD, et al. Variation in use of head computed tomography by emergency physicians. Am J Med. 2012; 125(4): 356-364. A research team led by Dr. Luciano Prevedello, a fellow at the Center for Evidence-Based Imaging …

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Abstracts in Urgent Care: April, 2012

Normalization of Vital Signs Does Not Reduce Risk for Acute Pulmonary Embolism Key point: Up to one-third of patients whose abnormal triage vital signs reverted to normal values had PE. Citation: Kline JA, Corredor DM, Hogg MM, et al. Normalization of vital signs does not reduce the probability of acute pulmonary embolism in symptomatic emergency department patients. Acad Emerg Med. 2010; 19(1): 11-17. In a prospective single-center study, researchers evaluated whether normalization of vital signs …

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Abstracts in Urgent Care – March 2009

Beware of Eyewitness Accounts of Syncope or Seizures Key point: Bystanders’ descriptions of acute neurologic events often are simply wrong. Citation: Thijs RD, Wagenaar WA, Middelkoop HAM, et al. Transient loss of consciousness through the eyes of a witness. Neurology. 2008; 71: 1713-1718. Diagnosis of sudden catastrophic illness depends a good deal on eyewitness accounts. But, as criminologists know, eyewitnesses can be unreliable. Now, a team of neurologists in the Netherlands has reconfirmed this finding. …

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