Abstracts In Urgent Care – April 2019

Rethinking IV Antibiotics for Cellulitis Key point: Oral antibiotics are noninferior to parenteral antibiotics for uncomplicated cellulitis. Erythema of cellulitis commonly expands somewhat, even if treated with appropriate antibiotics, for the first 1-2 days after starting treatment. Citation: Aboltins CA, Hutchinson AF, Sinnappu RN, et al. Oral versus parenteral antimicrobials for the treatment of cellulitis: a randomized non-inferiority trial, J Antimicrob Chemother. 2015;70(2):581-586. Patients with cellulitis are often referred from urgent care to the emergency department for “IV antibiotics.” This practice is based on the common belief, dogma even, that …
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Abstracts in Urgent Care-March 2019

Practice of Urgent Care: More Patients, More Decisions, More Fatigue Key point: We should be aware, as clinicians, that as we progress through our shifts, decision fatigue mounts. One manifestation of decision fatigue is an incremental decline in antibiotic stewardship. It is also important to understand that taking breaks seems to combat the harmful effects of decision fatigue. Citations: Linder JA, Doctor JN, Friedberg MW, et al. Time of day and the decision to prescribe antibiotics. JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(12):2029–2031. Pignatiello GA, Martin RJ, Hickman RL Jr. Decision fatigue: a …
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Abstracts In Urgent Care – February 2019

Check the Temps: A Timely Throwback Key points: Peripheral temperatures (ie, temporal, tympanic, oral, and axillary) are inaccurate and cannot reliably exclude the presence of fever. If absolute certainty regarding febrile status is critical (eg, neonates, immunosuppressed patients), a (gentle) rectal temperature is the preferred method of temperature acquisition in the urgent care setting. For all others, a tympanic temperature reading <37.5°C appears to best exclude true fever with reasonable certainty. Finally, all this comes with the important caveat that recent use of an antipyretic must also be considered when …
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Abstracts In Urgent Care – January 2019

A Brief Introduction Happy New Year! 2018 is now behind us and it was another great year for urgent care. We are fortunate to work in one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing fields in medicine. I find it thrilling that the future of urgent care is ours to define and design. According to data from the UCA, last year nearly 150 million patients received care in U.S. urgent care centers (UCCs). These patients deserve quality, evidence-based care; however, the rapid growth of urgent care has outpaced scholarly research …
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Abstracts In Urgent Care – December 2018

The Year in Abstracts: Top Papers of 2018 for the Urgent Care Clinician Reviewed by Andy S. Barnett, MD  This has been an eventful year in the urgent care marketplace. Then again, you could say that at the end of most years in our dynamic, ever-growing industry. That begs the question, what did set 2018 apart from other years? Mergers and acquisitions, evolving technologies, and workplace trends certainly impact what you do every day. But at the end of that day, it’s all about the patients. With that in mind, …
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