<strong>Despite Progress, Antimicrobial Resistance Remains a Threat. What Are You Doing About It?</strong>

Despite Progress, Antimicrobial Resistance Remains a Threat. What Are You Doing About It?

The U.S. healthcare system has been criticized for being a bit too willing to prescribe antibiotics, often for patients who are suffering through viral, not bacterial, infections, thereby fueling increases in antimicrobial resistance. To its credit, the urgent care industry has rallied together to make antibiotic stewardship a priority. That commitment needs to be continued and amplified to fight what the World Health Organization calls “high levels” of antimicrobial resistance around the globe, however, as …

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<strong>Update: Will the Measles Outbreak Creeping Across the Midwest Be Contained?</strong>

Update: Will the Measles Outbreak Creeping Across the Midwest Be Contained?

As we reported previously, an outbreak of measles in Ohio and Minnesota has sparked concerns that other states in the region and beyond could be vulnerable to a similar uptick in cases. While that fear has proven unfounded so far, the number of cases in Ohio has continued to climb over the past couple of months. As reported by The Hill, 85 cases have been confirmed, with hospitalization needed for 34 of those patients. The …

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<strong>Don’t Let the Tripledemic Distract You (or Patients) from ‘Typical’ Preventable Infectious Diseases</strong>

Don’t Let the Tripledemic Distract You (or Patients) from ‘Typical’ Preventable Infectious Diseases

The seemingly endless, start-and-stop recovery from the height of the COVID-19 pandemic and fluctuating reports of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus rates can suck up a lot of attention in mainstream and medical media—so much so that efforts to prevent other infectious diseases can slide under the radar. However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has continued to do its work as usual. ACIP adopted the following standards at …

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<strong>Multiple Drug Shortages Continue—and the Prospects for Timely Resolution Are Not Good</strong>

Multiple Drug Shortages Continue—and the Prospects for Timely Resolution Are Not Good

Tamiflu is the latest medication to be reported in short supply where levels of influenza continue to be high across the United States, according to new information from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. ASHP says 21 oseltamivir presentations are in short supply, with most of the eight manufacturers involved reporting no resupply date. The report notes that some pharmacists have started compounding some medications in response. JUCM News has reported previously on the ongoing …

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<strong>As Legal Marijuana Becomes More Common, so Do Associated Acute Care Visits by Older Adults</strong>

As Legal Marijuana Becomes More Common, so Do Associated Acute Care Visits by Older Adults

Older patients are presenting to emergency rooms with complaints related to marijuana use in greater numbers than ever before, according to research just published by the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Based on a trend analysis of California Department of Healthcare Access and Information records, the researchers reported that the rate of cannabis-related visits by patients 65 years of age and older increased from 20.7 per 100,000 visits to 395 visits/100,000 between 2005 and …

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<strong>Update: Don’t Underestimate the Growing Risk of Severe Strep A</strong>

Update: Don’t Underestimate the Growing Risk of Severe Strep A

Just a few weeks after we told you hospitals across the country were seeing far more cases of severe Streptococcus A infection than in a typical year, mainstream media outlets are again sounding the alarm that the tripledemic should not be the only concern for healthcare providers and families. According to a report from WWMT in Grand Rapids, MI, Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital, for one, has seen four cases of severe infection linked to group …

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<strong>Renewed Interest in Ketamine Could Drive Patients Your Way—Be Prepared</strong>

Renewed Interest in Ketamine Could Drive Patients Your Way—Be Prepared

A new wave of specialty clinics is stoking renewed interest from mainstream media and patients in the purported benefits, as well as the risks, of ketamine to treat select mental health issues. Medpage Today published an article online detailing how some providers—one of whom holds a medical license in 45 states—have established booming online “practices” devoted exclusively to facilitating access to ketamine. While ketamine has been used successfully in treating depression and anxiety, the Food …

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<strong>Tripledemic Update: Watch Out for More COVID—Thanks to a New Variant—as Flu and RSV Recede</strong>

Tripledemic Update: Watch Out for More COVID—Thanks to a New Variant—as Flu and RSV Recede

The fall and winter months have seen nearly constantly fluctuations in rates of COVID-19, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza. Reports from around the country show this is unlikely to change anytime soon. WKRC TV aired a story noting that while flu and RSV have been declining in the Cincinnati area, COVID has had a resurgence that is pushing an ever-growing number of patients to not only area hospitals, but also urgent care centers. Data from …

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<strong>Warnings of a Seasonal Bump in Respiratory Infections Are Coming to Fruition—with More to Follow</strong>

Warnings of a Seasonal Bump in Respiratory Infections Are Coming to Fruition—with More to Follow

As JUCM News readers know, public health officials and infectious disease specialists warned that holiday gatherings would likely prove to be fertile breeding grounds for COVID-19, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza. Just a couple of days into the new year, Alabama is the first state to announce that hospitalizations for COVID-19 started climbing shortly after Thanksgiving, to the point that they had essentially doubled (from 264 to 530) by New Year’s Day. Given that the …

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New Data Present a Different View of How Helpful ARB’s Are—or Aren’t—with COVID

New Data Present a Different View of How Helpful ARB’s Are—or Aren’t—with COVID

Last spring, published research suggested angiotensin receptor blockers could lower the risk for ventilation and vasopressors in men with COVID-19. Just this week, however, an article released by the Journal of the American Medical Association noted that ARBs do not improve outcomes in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. The trial included 787 patients at 17 hospitals in Australia and India and covered the period from May 2020 to November 2021. The vast majority of patients (n=778), …

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