New HPV Screen Allows for Simplified Patient Self-Collection

New HPV Screen Allows for Simplified Patient Self-Collection

The Food and Drug Administration has approved a testing protocol that allows patients to collect their own vaginal samples for human papillomavirus (HPV) screening in healthcare settings—including urgent care. It’s significant because it allows for HPV primary testing without the need for a traditional Pap smear performed with a speculum. The self-collected samples must still be sent to labs for analysis. While a Pap smear can potentially detect abnormalities in the cervix, the new HPV …

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Patients Do Well With Hypertension Self-Care

Patients Do Well With Hypertension Self-Care

A randomized clinical trial of 219 patients with uncontrolled hypertension showed in a secondary analysis that self-management programs including home blood pressure monitoring and self-titration of antihypertensive medication resulted in good outcomes. Published in JAMA Network Open, the study found significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (adjusted mean difference, −3.4 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (adjusted mean difference, −2.5 mm Hg) at 24 months. What’s more, patients had no increase in the use of …

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Semaglutide Keeps Weight Off For Years

Semaglutide Keeps Weight Off For Years

Yet another study is underscoring the benefits of semaglutide, as published in Nature Medicine this week. In a cardiovascular outcomes trial involving 17,604 adults with preexisting cardiovascular disease, overweight, or obesity without diabetes, semaglutide showed a 20% reduction in major adverse cardiovascular events. Those treated with semaglutide sustained weight loss for up to 4 years. Authors say improvements in cardiovascular risk factors can begin with weight loss of just 5%, and in the study, semaglutide was …

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Non-Antibiotic Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis Could Be a First-Line Choice

Non-Antibiotic Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis Could Be a First-Line Choice

A randomized controlled trial conducted in Europe found that dequalinium chloride has good efficacy for treating bacterial vaginosis (BV) in women without the use of antibiotics. When compared with the antibiotic metronidazole, dequalinium chloride was not only noninferior, it also had better tolerability and fewer adverse events, as published in JAMA Network Open. Study authors believe dequalinium chloride could help reduce antibiotic consumption and could be considered as first-line treatment for bacterial vaginosis with less …

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Florida Sees STIs Rise 42%

Florida Sees STIs Rise 42%

Sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates in Florida have surged by 42% over the past decade, surpassing levels from before the pandemic and reaching their highest point since 1990, according to Health News Florida. A leading expert in epidemiology at the University of South Florida College of Public Health attributes the rise to factors such as reduced condom use, the popularity of online dating platforms, and illicit drug use. However, it’s also possible that advancements in …

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Program Increases Appropriate Antibiotics for Pediatric Infections

Program Increases Appropriate Antibiotics for Pediatric Infections

A national quality improvement (QI) initiative resulted in increases in appropriate antibiotic prescribing for pediatric infections at 118 US hospitals, as published in Pediatrics. The QI program sought to encourage the use of appropriate antibiotic therapy for community-acquired pneumonia, skin and other soft-tissue infection, and urinary tract infection. Program actions included monthly feedback, education, coaching, order sets, and a mobile app with treatment recommendations. Overall, adherence to empirical antibiotic therapy was 72%; definitive antibiotic therapy …

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New Antibiotic Approved for UTIs

New Antibiotic Approved for UTIs

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the approval of the oral antibiotic pivmecillinam for treating uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women over age 18. Marketed as Pivya, pivmecillinam has a unique mechanism of action to treat UTIs caused by susceptible isolates of Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. It’s been in use outside of the United States for decades, but it’s the first antibiotic for UTIs approved by FDA in 20 years. …

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Alert Issued For Antibiotic-Resistant Campylobacter Infections

Alert Issued For Antibiotic-Resistant Campylobacter Infections

Clinicians should be on alert for cases of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter infection in men who have sex with men (MSM), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) warned in an information note on its website. In February, PAHO identified an outbreak of drug-resistant Campylobacter in 13 MSM in Minnesota and several previous outbreaks in the United States and Canada that date back to 1999. Patients may be presenting with diarrhea with dysentery features, the organization says. Here’s …

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Antibiotics Don’t Reduce Cough for UC Patients With LRTI

Antibiotics Don’t Reduce Cough for UC Patients With LRTI

Researchers studying 718 patients at primary care and urgent care sites found that antibiotics didn’t provide any benefit for patients with a cough caused by an acute lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), as published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. Evidence shows that antibiotic prescriptions actually were associated with a small increase in the duration of cough when patients receiving antibiotics were compared to those without. Time until resolution was the same whether the …

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Flu Season Winds Down With Lower Than Average Visits in Early April

Flu Season Winds Down With Lower Than Average Visits in Early April

Outpatient visits for flu like illness are on a steady decline in the United States, indicating reduced activity of respiratory viruses including flu, COVID, and respiratory syncytial virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports the first week of April showed that visits for respiratory illness with fever plus a cough or sore throat fell to 2.8%, just below the national baseline of 2.9%. Positive labs for flu were down 7.7% since the …

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