Clinical Challenges

  Case An 18-year-old woman was swimming in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida when suddenly she experienced a sharp, stinging pain on her arm. That evolved into a severe ache shortly, accompanied by a painful red lesion. She vomited on her way to your urgent care center, and still feels nauseous. She is also complaining of muscle cramps. View the photo and consider what your diagnosis and next steps would be. Resolution of the case is described on the next page.Read More
  Case A 38-year-old female patient presents with acute shoulder pain following a fall on an outstretched arm during a spring skiing vacation. There is a normal appearance to the shoulder, but significant pain even with minimal attempts at range of motion. The clavicle and elbow are nontender. Neurovascular status is intact. View the image taken (Figure 1) and consider what your diagnosis and next steps would be. Resolution of the case is described on the next page.Read More
Case The patient is a 62-year-old woman who presents to the urgent care center after 1 hour of intermittent dizziness and feeling of palpitations. She has no chest pain, fever, vomiting, or diarrhea. Further history reveals that she has a history of anxiety, which is manifested by intermittent feeling of heart “palpitations.” Her primary care doctor is treating her with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) for anxiety. Upon exam, you find: General: Alert and oriented; mildly tachypneic Lungs: CTAB Cardiovascular: Regular and tachycardic without murmur, rub, or gallop Abdomen:Read More
Case This 42-year-old woman presents to your urgent care center with a 2-hour history intermittent dizziness and vomiting. She denies diarrhea or exposure to ill persons. Further history reveals that she has recently had some epigastric discomfort. In the exam room, she is alert and oriented. She seems comfortable, in fact. In addition, you find: Lungs: Minimal bilateral symmetric wheezing Cardiovascular: Regular rate and rhythm without murmur, rub, or gallop Abdomen: Soft and nontender without rigidity, rebound, or guarding. No epigastric discomfort with palpation Extremities: No pain or swelling ofRead More
The patient is a 37-year-old man who reports a two-day history of chest pain. It worsens with exertion, and when he lays back; it improves when he’s sitting or leaning forward. He denies any diaphoresis, radiation, or back pain. No pleuritic aspect. During the exam, he is alert and oriented, and in no distress. In addition, you find: Lungs: Clear to auscultation bilaterally Cardiovascular: Regular rate and rhythm without murmur, rub, or gallop Abdomen: Soft and nontender without rigidity, rebound, or guarding. No pulsatile abdominal mass Extremities: No pain orRead More
Case A 28-year-old woman presents to urgent care with elbow pain and swelling following a mechanical fall. She reports the pain is worse with range of motion. There is no shoulder or wrist pain, and no paresthesias. Exam confirms pain with palpation and decreased range of motion. The radial pulse is 2+; sensation distal to the elbow is grossly intact. The patient is afebrile, has a pulse of 104, respirations 20, and BP 124/80. View the image taken (Figure 1) and consider what your diagnosis and next steps would be.Read More
Case A 67-year-old male presents with acute mid-low back pain following a fall. He describes the pain as “dull and constant.” When asked if the pain is worse with range of motion, he replies, “I think so.” Physical exam reveals he is afebrile, has a pulse of 102, respirations 20, and blood pressure 122/78. His abdomen is soft and nontender without rigidity, rebound, or guarding; there is no bruising or distention. His back appears normal, though there is mild discomfort with deep palpation in the right low back musculature. TheRead More

Posted On February 28, 2017 By In Clinical Challenges

Glass in Foot

Case The patient is an 8-year-old boy with pain in the right foot for the last several hours. He refuses to walk on the foot. There is no reported injury. On physical exam, you find there is a normal appearance to the foot (no erythema,  swelling). However, there is pain with palpation over the plantar aspect of the mid aspect of the right foot. View the image taken (Figure 1) and consider what your diagnosis would be. Resolution of the case is described on the next page.Read More